2021 Monaco GP

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Everso Biggyballies
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2021 Monaco GP

Post by Everso Biggyballies » 1 month ago

2021 Monaco GP
20-23 May 2021


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First up a reminder to all those doing the GTP thing that P1 for Monaco is always on the Thursday so get your times in early!


So here is the schedule for the weekend, in local Monaco times.


SUNDAY 23 MAY
Race

15:00 - 17:00

SATURDAY 22 MAY
Qualifying

15:00 - 16:00

SATURDAY 22 MAY
Practice 3
12:00 - 13:00

THURSDAY 20 MAY
Practice 2

15:00 - 16:00

THURSDAY 20 MAY
Practice 1

11:30 - 12:30


Dont say you havn't been warned.

Going to start this off with piccies of the best F1 livery I have seen for a long time.....

McLaren will pay tribute to one of the most iconic liveries in motorsport history at this weekend’s Formula 1 Monaco Grand Prix.

The team will temporarily ditch the broadly orange design in favour of the colours of oil partner, Gulf.

The British team’s initial association with Gulf dates-back to the days of team founder Bruce McLaren, with the two companies working together in F1 and Can-Am racing in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

They renewed their relationship last July, when Gulf Oil came on board as a strategic partner, and ahead of F1’s showpiece event, McLaren have unveiled their take on one of motorsport’s most famous and iconic liveries. It will see the car decked out in the company’s famous blue, with an orange stripe down the centre reminiscent of the livery worn by the 1967 24 Hours of Le Mans-winning Ford GT40.

Daniel Ricciardo and Lando Norris will also wear retro designs on their helmets, especially created for Monaco.

Both helmets will be raffled off for the team’s mental health charity, Mind. :twothumbs:

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Video of the reveal overnight:




First Grand Prix
1950

Number of Laps
78

Circuit Length
3.337km

Race Distance
260.286 km

Lap Record
1:14.260 Max Verstappen (2018)

We all know what the track layout is, but post this for the DRS info.....

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Monte Carlo
When was the track built?

In 1215, sort of – that’s when Monaco was first established as a colony of Genoa.

When was its first Grand Prix?
It was 1929 when racing engines first reverberated around the Principality, after cigarette manufacturer Antony Noghes decided to organise a race with his pals from the Automobile Club de Monaco. The race was part of the calendar in the first year of the Formula 1 World Championship in 1950, and hasn’t been off it since 1955, other than the Covid inspired cancellation of 2020.

What’s the circuit like?
Incredibly narrow and totally iconic. Nelson Piquet memorably described driving around Monaco as “like riding a bicycle around your living room”… which is fair. Despite that, it’s a challenge that nearly all drivers love, forcing them to put their skills on the line and rewarding millimetric accuracy. Overtaking on the tight streets is harder, however, with the 2003 Grand Prix witnessing a grand total of zero passing moves!

Covering an area of 1.95 square kilometres, Monaco is the smallest independent state in the world after Vatican City. It comprises the districts of Monte Carlo, La Condamine, Fontvieille, Le Larvotto, Les Moneghetti and Monaco Ville. This gambler's paradise and tax haven has a population of 32,400, of whom just 5,070 are true Monegasques. With around 17,000 people per square kilometre, Monaco is the most densely populated state in the world.

The idea for a Formula One race around the streets of Monaco came from Anthony Noghes, the president of the Monegasque car club and close friend of the ruling Grimaldi family.Always held on the weekend following Ascension Day, the Monaco Grand Prix remains the most famous race on the F1 calendar.

Only since 2004 have there been garages for the cars along the pit lane in Monaco. Prior to that, teams had to push the cars back and forth between makeshift garages in the paddock or an underground garage for each practice and qualifying session and the race.

The Monaco circuit is the shortest GP course in the calendar at 3.340 kilometres. Nowhere else does a race cover more laps (78). The race distance of 260.520 kilometres is the shortest of the season.

Prior to Charles Leclerc only one grand prix racer was born in the Principality and he is better remembered for his flamboyant chequered flag waving antics at the end of the grand prix than for his performance at the wheel.

Louis Chiron was in at the beginning of the F1 World Championship in 1950, (aged 50 then) retiring in the very first race at Silverstone and stepping up to the Royal Box after a dashing drive to third place in Round 2 in Monaco at the wheel of a Maserati. He won several pre-war grands prix, including Monaco where he took victory in the 1931 race driving a Bugatti. . After the war, Chiron was racing again, winning the French GP on two occasions prior to the WDC years. In 1954, at the wheel of a Lancia, he won the Monte Carlo Rally, becoming the only person in History to win both the Monte-Carlo Rally and the Monte-Carlo Monaco GP. Louis Chiron later became race director of the Monaco Grand Prix and the Monte Carlo Rally.

The race provided future five-time world champion Juan Manuel Fangio with his first win in a World Championship race, when he won the 1950 GP. He also became the first double winner when he won again in 1957

The 10 races between 1984 to 1993 were all won by only two drivers – Prost and Senna. Senna was arrested on the Monday following one race win, for riding a motorcycle without wearing a helmet.... he was released by Police after they realised who he was. I can say I have officially matched Ayrton on that having had the same treatment when I went to Monaco on my 750 back in the 70's. However I got the full treatment as I was also arrested for not wearing a top in public. (Illegal for males, but it seems not females) :haha:

Apologies but photobucket have frozen my acount and some of the images will only show as thumbnails

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The annual dash through the Principality's tortuous streets is a unique test of man and machine performed in front of the glamorous backdrop of the Monaco harbour. Monaco is Formula One up close and personal. Nowhere else do spectators get quite so close to the action as in the streets of the Principality. And no other Grand Prix is as famous or as glamorous as this one. The yachts, the parties, the show business - nowhere are they such an integral part of the Formula One experience as here.

This week marks near enough the 71st anniversary of the very first round of the FIA Formula One World Championship, which was held at Silverstone on May 13, 1950. The British Grand Prix, which also had the title of 'Grand Prix d'Europe' bestowed upon it that year, was the first event in a seven-race season, which also featured rounds in Monaco, Switzerland, Belgium, France and Italy, plus the Indianapolis 500.

Well, we have come a long way since then, and in fact there is only one F1 team that was at the first GP (Alfa Romeo, and they have only just reappeared) that is still around from that first race, which featured 25 starters from Maserati, Alfa Romeo, ERA, Talbot Lago, and Alta in the manufacturers list.

The second race of the series was at Monaco, and saw those cars joined by Cooper, Simca Gordini, and 4 cars from a mob under the name of Ferrari.... a total of 26 cars. Only 19 started in a 3x2x3 grid formation! (Yes 3 wide on the front row, with two on the second 3 on the third....).

Havent we progressed since then...... :dunno:

Anyway, moving back to the present we head to Monaco for the GP that says more about F1 than any other.

The 3.340km (2.075mile) street track requires the cars to run with maximum aerodynamic downforce and the proximity of the barriers makes the 78-lap race one of the most mentally demanding for the drivers, despite the average lap speed of 160kph (100mph) being one of the slowest of the year. The right strategy, and sometimes also luck during the race, play a more important role at the street circuit in Monaco than at any other race track. Of course this year we are limited somewhat in the strategy implications with no refuelling, but timing of tyre changes will be critical once more.

There is a common belief that overtaking improves the spectacle, but over the years Monaco produces exciting races because the field is often very close together in a train, usually behind a much slower car. The quicker guys trying to force their way through every overtaking manoeuvre, which entails a degree of risk no matter who you are passing.

Safety Cars are a very likely occurence.

Monaco is the only grand prix where frogmen join the usual team of track marshals.

With much of the circuit running along the harbour they bob up and down on their boats throughout the weekend. They have only been called on twice to pull men out of the Med, on both occasions at the chicane. In 1955, Alberto Ascari decided to see if his Lancia would float, and ten years later Paul Hawkins decided the best place for a Lotus was at the bottom of the harbour. One of the most spectacular crashes came at Mirabeau corner in 1986, when Patrick Tambay somersaulted his Lola. Luckily the car landed on its wheels and the driver emerged shaken, stirred but unhurt.


The shortest and slowest circuit on the calendar. Ironically it is the race with the most number of laps (78) but also is , at 260 klms in total length, the shortest race on the calendar in distance.

Monaco is really hard on the cars, particularly on transmissions: 50+ gear changes per lap (one every two seconds) and near enough 4,000 gear changes during the race.

The secret of the Monte Carlo racing circuit is to have a good chassis. It is about having the right amount of downforce so that the rear tyres do not get ruined in a race. It is not about engines. There is a certain amount of extra input from the driver, of course, and precision is the key which can make time, but the dominant factor is the car.

It is likely that the Monte-Carlo street circuit will continue with clear tendency to throw up some of the most unexpected results of the season. The race on the Côte d'Azur holds varied memories for Button, after being unable to race following ban for his B.A.R team in 2005 preceded by missing out on his first Grand Prix victory by less than half a second the previous year. JB was also deprived of race action in 2003 following a heavy crash in practice. Of course he joined the illustrious winners list with a win in the at the time dominant Brawn, blessed with its downforce generating diffuser. It is very different and it is 'chuck all the downforce on', don't worry about the drag and see what happens track..

THE TRACK

The circuit winds its way through the streets, from Ste devote, it goes uphill to Casino square, then plunges back down to Mirabeau before heading into the Loews hairpin.

The tunnel that leads to the harbour-side chicane echoes with the roar of the engines.

This is one track however where overtaking is virtually impossible.


Full throttle: 55%
Brake wear: Medium-Hard
Downforce level: High - 10/10
Top speed: 286 km/h
Longest stretch at full throttle: 8 sec / 510 m

“Unpredictable is the word that sums up Monaco from a performance perspective. At Monaco literally anything can happen.”

The whole lap at Monaco is just a non-stop challenge and you have to maintain absolute focus and concentration over every single one of the 78 laps of the race. The absolute key to a really quick lap is to not let the barriers intimidate you as this is a circuit that rewards precision. Having a good qualifying session and getting the best grid position possible is so important to a successful weekend. Passing is very difficult during the race, so you need to make a good start and do your overtaking off the line where possible.

Monaco Lap description

The 77-lap Monaco Grand Prix begins with a short burst of acceleration before the perilous right hand of Virage St Devote. It then accelerates again up through the gears from St Devote before slowing for the sharp left turn into Casino Square. Thereafter the race opens up once again for the downhill section past the Hotel Metropole.

Keeping to the right in the approach to the Hotel Mirabeau corner, the Monaco Grand Prix gathers speed before dramatically slowing down for the hairpin at the Monte Carlo Grande Hotel and the sharp right turn of the Virage du Portier.

Going down into the cool darkness of the tunnel, where the sweeping curve facilitates the Monaco circuit's fastest section, the cars accelerate up through the gears. The cars then emerge into the sunlight at 280 kilometres per hour (174 miles per hour).

The cars reduce speed for the tight left and right of the chicane, then there's a brief surge of speed just before the swimming pool. The hairpin of Virage Rascasse leads on to the uphill section, before the treacherous Virage Anthony Noghes and a burst of acceleration towards the end of the first lap, to face again the challenge of Virage St Devote.

Some stuff I pulled from a previous Monaco preview I did . Might not include 2018,19 info but you get that.

THE TECHNICAL CHALLENGE

From a technical point of view, Monaco is not as much of an enigma as many people think.

The track has been re-surfaced several times in recent years, which means the asphalt is similar to many permanent racetracks around the world, and from a set-up point of view, it is simply at one extreme of the aero and mechanical scale.

The cars run with maximum aerodynamic downforce throughout the weekend, so set-up choices are mechanical. the engineers and drivers to focus on maximising the mechanical grip generated by the cars. Teams will use any method at their disposal to gain more downforce at Monaco. In the 2006 race, Williams went for a simple but effective triple mid wing on the FW28's engine cover. This not only adds downforce in the centre of the car, it also helps to manage airflow passing to the rear wing, hence increasing its efficiency.

Aero is purely get all the downforce you can and then trim to get an optimum balance.

Drivers have to find a set-up that allows them to steer a very precise line between the barriers.

Being a well used street circuit needs to be F1'd lets call it. It needs to get rubbered up.

It is generally best not to change the car's set-up too much during first practice on Thursday as the circuit only becomes representative in session two, once the surface has started to collect rubber.

Being a town centre type road circuit though this does throw other curve-balls which in itself provides a number of challenges, such as the unusual camber with the track peaking in the middle and dropping down to the gutters on either side of the road, manhole covers and the white lines. This does see the team use a slightly higher ride height than normal, as well as a more compliant suspension set-up will be fitted to the cars. The tight, twisty nature of the track means that the highest downforce of the season can be used, to allow for greater performance through all the corners without compromising speed on the straights, as there is no section of the track that needs this capability. The constant cornering also demands good front end grip for exact positioning.


CHASSIS

Ride heights:

The roads in the Principality may feel billiard-smooth at the wheel of a road car, but they are the equivalent of cobbles for the rock-hard suspension of a Formula 1 car. The public roads are not only bumpy, but sharply cambered and very slippery – especially on the traffic markings that are dotted around the circuit. The track surface is particularly low grip in the early part of the weekend, and it continues rubbering-in until the final lap of the Grand Prix on Sunday. To cope with the variations in track surface, ride heights are raised around 5 to 7mm relative to the norm.


Suspension:

In order to maximise the car’s grip, teams use softer suspension settings than normal.

They help the car to ride the bumps and changes of camber. The surface also means that the wheels must be able to move independently to cope with the bumps, and so soften the anti-roll bars to achieve this. Special attention is paid to suspension camber angles too. They run fairly high negative camber, but not so much as to make the car unstable at the rear in the bumpy, high-speed braking zones. The key objective is to give the driver a neutral, driveable car that he can have confidence in around the circuit.


Aerodynamics:

At the risk of being repetitive Monaco demands the highest downforce levels of the season.

Contrary to popular belief, the primary benefit does not come in the corners, as many of them are taken at such low speeds that mechanical grip is of greater importance. Rather, the gains from high downforce come under braking and acceleration, keeping the car stable into the corners – and ensuring optimum traction on the exit.


Steering angle:

The famous hairpin at the Grand Hotel is the tightest of the year – along with the sharp turn at Rascasse. This demands the highest steering angle of the season, some two times greater than anything required in Barcelona. Traction control and the differential are tuned to help the car turn on the throttle, while special notches are usually cut in the top wishbones to ensure the necessary steering lock can be applied.

Cooling:
With the engine running at full throttle for so little of the time, you might think cooling is not a problem – but you’d be wrong. The lack of straights however, does require use of the maximum cooling package available. The engine is only cooled by the car’s movement through the air, and the absence of long straights coupled with the slow average lap speed makes cooling tricky. This is exacerbated by the fact that the short gear ratios mean the engine is often running at high revs. Bodywork is therefore sometimes opened up to ensure the engine stays within its operating temperature limits.


GEARBOX

Closely-spaced gear ratios are used at this circuit in order to optimise acceleration, and get the most from the engine at slow speeds.

The gearbox will have to cope with 53 gearchanges per lap – a total of nearly 4150 per lap.


BRAKES

Brake wear is not a problem here. Instead the low speeds mean the issue is keeping the brakes up to working temperature. The only heavy braking points are at the chicane after the tunnel, and to a lesser extent the Ste Devote and Mirabeau corners. With a lack of temperature, brake bite becomes a problem, as the surface of the carbon brake disc becomes smooth as glass, reducing friction between the pads and the disk, hence lessening braking power. To combat this, in the past some teams have adopted discs with radial grooves that increase the bite rate between disk and pads, hence increasing the average temperature of the brakes.

STRATEGY

Strategy at Monaco is one of those things that has to be flexible, given the likleyhood of Safety Cars, and the importance of track position and steering clear of traffic, a drivers worst enemy at the principality.

Repeat winners (drivers)
Drivers in bold are competing in the Formula One championship in the current season.


Ayrton Senna won the race a record six times. 16 drivers have won the race more than once in the modern era.


Wins Driver Years won
6 Ayrton Senna 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993
5 Graham Hill 1963, 1964, 1965, 1968, 1969
Michael Schumacher 1994, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001
4 Alain Prost 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988
3 Stirling Moss 1956, 1960, 1961
Jackie Stewart 1966, 1971, 1973
Nico Rosberg 2013, 2014, 2015
2 Juan Manuel Fangio 1950, 1957
Maurice Trintignant 1955, 1958
Niki Lauda 1975, 1976
Jody Scheckter 1977, 1979
David Coulthard 2000, 2002
Fernando Alonso 2006, 2007
Lewis Hamilton 2008, 2016,2019
Mark Webber 2010, 2012
Sebastian Vettel 2011, 2017
Danny Ricciardo 2018 (just realised this list is for multiple winners and Danny Ric only won it once, but included as he is a current driver. Also applicable to Kimi Raikkonen who totally dominated the race in 2005.

Stirling Moss won in 1956, but in '57, he was involved in an accident at the chicane, and handed victory to Fangio. Moss was the main pace setter in this era, and his most memorable victory was in 1961 when he expertly held off both Ferraris. Forward to the modern era and it was the first race following Ayrton Senna's tragic death in 1994, and it saw Michael Schumacher dominate, as he did again in 1995. Olivier Panis scored a surprise win - the only win of his long career - for Prost in 1996, and Schumacher dominated once again in wet conditions in 1997.

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The McLaren of Mika Hakkinen took the honours in 1998, with Schumacher and the Ferrari returning to claim the Germans fourth win the following season. 2000 was David Coulthard's time to shine, the Scot winning ahead of Ferrari driver, Rubens Barrichello and Benetton's Giancarlo Fisichella. In 2001 Coulthard was sent to the back of the grid for stalling and spent most of the event stuck behind the Arrows of Enrique Bernoldi as Michael Schumacher romped home for another Monaco win. However, the Scot got his own back in 2002 with a well-deserved victory, his one and only win of the season.

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Prince Rainier and other members of Monaco's ruling Grimaldi family have always watched "their" race and presented the prizes in the Royal Box opposite the pits. Until quite recently, this event always started later than other grands prix, so that the Royal lunch break would not be interrupted. The old three thirty start made one wonder if perhaps they were also doing the washing-up before the race could begin. Nowadays it seems Bernies TV demands have led to them taking an early lunch, as the race now starts at 2.00pm


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In terms of the track history, there have been some changes over the years, although refinements would be a better way of putting it, as the layout has barely changed other than reprofiling.

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On the 14th of April 1929, the 1st Monaco Grand Prix started, with a lap of honour in a 'Torpedo Voisin' driven by Charles Faroux, course director. There were 16 cars on the starting grid, positions drawn by lots: 8 Bugattis, 3 Alfa Romeos, 2 Maseratis, 1 Licorne and 1 Mercedes SSK.

An Englishman by the name of Williams, (ironically a chauffeur by trade) who arrived too late to take part in the official trial sessions, got up at dawn on the Saturday and stunned all onlookers with an unofficial practice run. Williams went on to win the Grand Prix in a green 35B Bugatti in 3 hours, 56 minutes and 11 seconds, with an average speed over 100 laps of 80.194 km/h. The race was a phenomenal success. It was one of the first rounds included in the pre-War European Championship (a precursor to the current World Championship).

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On the 19th of April 1932, Sir Malcolm Campbell opened the 2nd Monaco Grand Prix at the wheel of a superb black aluminium Rolls Royce Torpedo. Campbell had recently beaten the world land speed record at 408.621 km/h in his now famous Bluebird, so was a well known person in the area of Motor Sports.

From 1938 to 1947, the Grand Prix could not be held due to both financial difficulties and a shortage of competitors as well as a deteriorating international climate with WWII in full swing in 1939.

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Finally on the 16th of May 1948, the almost forgotten sound of racing engines was once more heard on the streets of the Principality. However on the 9th of May 1949, Prince Louis II died and the Grand Prix was not held that year.

On the 21st of May 1950 the Monte Carlo GP was incorporated as Round 2 of the new WDC championship (Silverstone was the first ever round).

Juan Manuel Fangio won the 1950 GP which in fact although the first Monaco of the modern era (1950. with the introduction of the WDC is regarded as the start of the mofern era) was the Monaco GP. The following year the race was once again cancelled due to budgetary concerns and because rules for newer faster cars had not yet been drafted. The 12th Grand Prix was held on request of HSH the Sovereign Prince. However, it was run with sports cars as the international regulations had still not yet been finalized. In 1953 and 1954 the Grand Prix were not held for the same reason.


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On the 21st May 1955, the 13th Monaco Grand Prix took place on the same old course and has been held every year since.(Other than the Covid cancelled 2020 race)

Since then the course has undergone numerous minor transformations,
most in fact done for the reason of maximising pit space. In the 1950's cars when not racing were located at various car parks around the town, proximity to the race course by championship position, the best teams getting the best or closest spots. I have many pictiures of the cars being wheeled through the streets on their way to the pit area for scrutineering or in preparation to use the track.The biggest change to date was in 1973, when the new 'Swimming Pool section was built detouring the cars a little to allow for the pits that allowed most of the cars to be kept near the pits when not racing.

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* 1973, the swimming pool section, providing an area for pits on the quay,

* 1976, two new chicanes were added at Sainte Dévote and the exit of the Rascasse hairpin,

* 1986, the widening of the Quai des Etats-Unis with the addition of a new chicane,

* 1997, the original S-bend around the swimming pool was redesigned and called the "Louis Chiron" bend,

* 2003, the first phase of works only affected the southern side of the port. 5000 square metres of land were reclaimed from the sea. The circuit between the 2nd S-bend of the swimming pool and the Rascasse was moved 10 metres and completely redesigned.

A chicane was added to the exit from the second swimming-pool bend,

* 2004, works doubled the width of the promenade where the pits on the boulevard Albert 1er are located, by building over the old track between the swimming pool and the Rascasse.

250 square metres of new pits provided for the teams.


Here are simple images of the circuit layout changes.
Click for larger image.


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I have separated the following pics from the above, as to me this shows the original spirit of Monaco
, here showing Bandini having to push his Ferrari to the track, and Hill sit in traffic, mixing it in with non race traffic, in the days when the cars were all housed in a paddock seperate from the track and had to make their way to the track every session..

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No news to report on a Mongol invasion..... the only invasions have been that of Grand Prix drivers and millionaires attracted to the tax laws, and multiple poseurs and wannabee glitterati.
Last edited by Everso Biggyballies 1 month ago, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by MonteCristo » 1 month ago

Nice Gulf throwback livery.
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Post by Circuitmaster » 1 month ago

Hasn't been off the calendar since 1955? 2020 would like a word..
Guess the pole champion 2014
Guess the pole champion 2015
Guess the pole accuracy champion 2015

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Post by Everso Biggyballies » 1 month ago

Circuitmaster wrote:
1 month ago
Hasn't been off the calendar since 1955? 2020 would like a word..
Im not sure what happened there.... I noticed that when I read it through after posting and edited in "other than the Covid inspired cancellation of 2020". Maybe I forgot to click the submit button. I did a few edits when I first posted it .... others have been recorded but not that one.

Anyway, now edited and updated.

Good to see you read it and it wasnt a waste of time putting it together. :wink:

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Post by MonteCristo » 1 month ago

Circuitmaster wrote:
1 month ago
2020 would like a word..
2020 can fuck off :P.
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Post by White six » 1 month ago

These frogmen, are they actually half frog and half man?

I suppose most Monaco residents are half frog

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Post by John » 1 month ago

Bring back the Gasworks hairpin.
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Post by Everso Biggyballies » 1 month ago

White six wrote:
1 month ago
These frogmen, are they actually half frog and half man?

I suppose most Monaco residents are half frog
More than half of them speak Frog as well. :wink:

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Post by White six » 1 month ago

John wrote:
1 month ago
Bring back the Gasworks hairpin.
Named after what happened in your sparco underpants

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Post by Kai-Star » 1 month ago

Nice intro. I couldn't scroll through it fast enough let alone have time to read it.

Will this be the first race this season where Hamilton and Verstappen won't go wheel to wheel?
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Post by Everso Biggyballies » 1 month ago

Yuki Tsunoda needs to get a decent result here to make up for some of his rookie errors so far. He got two points at Bahrain but has not scored since whilst Gasly has amassed 8 points, scoring in every race bar Bahrain. Tsunoda has his work cut out though..... he will be learning the layout for the first time, unlike the other two rookies: Mick Schumacher and Nikita Mazepin, who both raced Formula 2 in Monaco. Yuki missed out on running at Monaco is his only F2 year due to the Covid cancellation of the meeting.

Max of course could do with a good result here (ie a win) to keep his chances in with the title race. He also needs to get the Monaco monkey off his back... he has had a 4th a 5th, a 9th and a couple of own fault crashes here to date. Of course his at the time teamate Danny Ric should have won in 2016 but suffered a pit lane blunder by the team ( Max crashed out that year) and DR did win in 2018, despite a down on power engine for most of the race (Max made a mistake in the third free practice session that forced him to start from the back... he finished 9th). Max did get close to a podium in 2019 but suffered a 5 second penalty. Team mate Gasly finished just behind him, notching up the FL in the process. That is the only occasion Max has ever beaten a teamate at Monaco in his career. :omg:

Current team mate Sergio Perez has not had the best of results at Monaco, but he has at least got a Monaco podium trophy in his cabinet. (from 2016 when at Force India)

Its a track which traditionally suits the Red Bulls well, but not it seems Max.

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Post by DoubleFart » 1 month ago

Perez' best Monaco opportunity ended in the barriers and a hospital trip. He looked good back then.
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Post by XcraigX » 1 month ago

Everso Biggyballies wrote:
1 month ago
Yuki Tsunoda needs to get a decent result here to make up for some of his rookie errors so far. He got two points at Bahrain but has not scored since whilst Gasly has amassed 8 points, scoring in every race bar Bahrain. Tsunoda has his work cut out though..... he will be learning the layout for the first time, unlike the other two rookies: Mick Schumacher and Nikita Mazepin, who both raced Formula 2 in Monaco. Yuki missed out on running at Monaco is his only F2 year due to the Covid cancellation of the meeting.

Max of course could do with a good result here (ie a win) to keep his chances in with the title race. He also needs to get the Monaco monkey off his back... he has had a 4th a 5th, a 9th and a couple of own fault crashes here to date. Of course his at the time teamate Danny Ric should have won in 2016 but suffered a pit lane blunder by the team ( Max crashed out that year) and DR did win in 2018, despite a down on power engine for most of the race (Max made a mistake in the third free practice session that forced him to start from the back... he finished 9th). Max did get close to a podium in 2019 but suffered a 5 second penalty. Team mate Gasly finished just behind him, notching up the FL in the process. That is the only occasion Max has ever beaten a teamate at Monaco in his career. :omg:

Current team mate Sergio Perez has not had the best of results at Monaco, but he has at least got a Monaco podium trophy in his cabinet. (from 2016 when at Force India)

Its a track which traditionally suits the Red Bulls well, but not it seems Max.
So Perez, Hamilton, Bottas this time?
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Post by White six » 1 month ago

Everso Biggyballies wrote:
1 month ago
Yuki Tsunoda needs to get a decent result here to make up for some of his rookie errors so far. He got two points at Bahrain but has not scored since whilst Gasly has amassed 8 points, scoring in every race bar Bahrain. Tsunoda has his work cut out though..... he will be learning the layout for the first time, unlike the other two rookies: Mick Schumacher and Nikita Mazepin, who both raced Formula 2 in Monaco. Yuki missed out on running at Monaco is his only F2 year due to the Covid cancellation of the meeting.

Max of course could do with a good result here (ie a win) to keep his chances in with the title race. He also needs to get the Monaco monkey off his back... he has had a 4th a 5th, a 9th and a couple of own fault crashes here to date. Of course his at the time teamate Danny Ric should have won in 2016 but suffered a pit lane blunder by the team ( Max crashed out that year) and DR did win in 2018, despite a down on power engine for most of the race (Max made a mistake in the third free practice session that forced him to start from the back... he finished 9th). Max did get close to a podium in 2019 but suffered a 5 second penalty. Team mate Gasly finished just behind him, notching up the FL in the process. That is the only occasion Max has ever beaten a teamate at Monaco in his career. :omg:

Current team mate Sergio Perez has not had the best of results at Monaco, but he has at least got a Monaco podium trophy in his cabinet. (from 2016 when at Force India)

Its a track which traditionally suits the Red Bulls well, but not it seems Max.
I think Yuki is absolutely nailed on to end up in the Armco

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Post by DoubleFart » 1 month ago

I'd be tempted to take a bet that Mazespin WON'T hit the armco this weekend.
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