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Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 14:29 pm
by Cheeveer

Latest post of the previous page:

Peugeot will be back in 2022!

http://www.dailysportscar.com/2019/11/1 ... -2022.html
With this announcement Peugeot joins Toyota, Aston Martin, Glickenhaus and ByKolles in formally committing to Hypercar. It is not clear whether ‘2022’ refers to a late season entry in 2021/22 (Season 9) or a full-season effort the following season.

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 18:24 pm
by John
Is ByKolles building their own car or is it a co-op job with another manufacturer? Regardless, the amount of names already putting their name in the hat for the Hypercar regs is really exciting. I hope Brabham comes aboard as well. Might well be the start of a new golden age for sports car racing.

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 18:33 pm
by erwin greven
I think they will build a hypercar on their own.
ByKolles reiterates Le Mans plans

WEC stalwart ByKolles has reaffirmed its intent to contest Le Mans next year with its ENSO CLM-Gibson P1/01 LMP1 car.
ByKolles team manager Boris Bermes told Motorsport.com that the plan is to contest the Spa WEC round at the end of April and then Le Mans with a solo car.
The German-based team has stood down from a full WEC campaign in 2019/20 in order to develop a new hypercar for next season.
https://www.motorsport.com/wec/news/gin ... n/4548210/

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 22:15 pm
by erwin greven
Neveu: Peugeot Hypercar Does Not Affect DPi Integration Talks

DPi 2.0 talks intensifying despite WEC’s third OEM confirmed for Hypercar platform…


FIA World Endurance Championship CEO Gerard Neveu says Peugeot’s recently announced Hypercar program for 2022 has “absolutely not” affected the ACO’s ongoing discussions with IMSA on the proposed integration of the DPi 2.0 platform into the WEC’s top class.

Announced earlier this month, the French manufacturer has committed to a factory hybrid-powered Hypercar program that will likely debut in the 2022-23 WEC season.

While Peugeot becomes the third major automaker to commit to the platform, Neveu said efforts to unite the two sanctioning bodies through an interchangeable top class of cars has never been stronger, following a meeting between senior-level ACO and IMSA executives and technical staff in Miami.

“There’s no secret that we had a meeting last week,” Neveu told Sportscar365. “We’ve never had such a good relationship that we now have with IMSA.

“The idea is to make sure we can join. It doesn’t mean we have to destroy what we have on each side.”

Neveu has even suggested that Peugeot’s yet-to-be-named Hypercar, which is believed to feature a front-wheel driven hybrid system, could potentially be eligible for IMSA competition, should the agreement be reached.

“The fact that Peugeot is in is another good news for everybody, including IMSA,” he said.

“If one day we can see the Peugeot Hypercar racing in America, all the people would be very happy about that. It’s good for endurance.

“The idea with IMSA is to make sure we play the same game together in sports car racing, which is the idea. We’re doing the same job. We have a lot of respect for IMSA and I’m sure [they feel the same way].

“We have to be together.”

When asked if an announcement confirming a joint cooperation between the DPi and Hypercar platforms could come as early as January’s Rolex 24 at Daytona, as suggested by several industry sources to Sportscar365, Neveu refused to comment.

“If there has to be an announcement, there are two very efficient presidents, in Jim France and Pierre Fillon, so let them speak,” he said. “The teams are working.”

Peugeot’s Commitment Validates Future for Hypercar Platform

Neveu said Peugeot’s announcement confirms that there’s “clearly a future” for Hypercar, although admits that there are not many other manufacturers “seriously looking” at the platform at this time.

“It’s a big satisfaction of course,” Neveu said of Peugeot’s comeback. “Who would not be happy about that?

“There’s a very good indication if you see the level of positive comments on social media. After that, it was something very powerful. I was not surprised but it means that Peugeot left a very good souvenir.

“I think this is very good news for sports car racing. This is the confirmation that there is clearly a future for the Hypercar platform and we have to continue to develop. But this is positive news and we’ll take it for sure.

“Very frankly, there are few manufacturers that are looking seriously with this category. But the fact that one more has confirmed is a big help for sure.”
https://sportscar365.com/lemans/wec/nev ... ion-talks/

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 20:36 pm
by erwin greven
Peugeot, Rebellion Announce Hypercar Partnership

Peugeot, Rebellion announce tie-up for 2022 WEC Hypercar program…

Image

Peugeot has announced a partnership with current LMP1 entrant Rebellion for its entry into the Hypercar class of the FIA World Endurance Championship in 2022.

Swiss company Rebellion is set to provide technical support in the development of the French manufacturer’s hybrid race car, which was confirmed three weeks ago.

Wednesday’s announcement of the partnership also produced the first render of the anticipated Peugeot hypercar, which is set to compete against OEM offerings from Aston Martin and Toyota as well as privateer efforts in the WEC and the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

“The program will kick off in 2022 and we are extremely happy to be teaming up with one of endurance racing’s big names,” said Jean-Marc Finot, director of PSA Motorsport.

“Rebellion Racing’s experience in the WEC will be a big asset as we put together the strongest possible team for our program, and this was corroborated by the team’s recent victory in Shanghai.

“The roles will be divided as a function of our respective competencies but we will form a single entity working out of Versailles-Satory [near Paris, France].”

Last month, Finot would not rule out the possibility of third parties coming on board to support what will be a full factory Peugeot hypercar project.

Meanwhile, long-time WEC entrant Rebellion has been pushing to secure its involvement in the hypercar formula in recent months, with team director Calim Bouhadra telling Sportscar365 in September that the company’s aim was to have a technical partnership agreed before the end of the year.

Peugeot has confirmed that the hypercar project’s technical team will be assembled in January 2020.

Rebellion Corporation president Alexandre Pesci added: “I believe that the passion of our two companies speaks for us as a common and simple language.

“Together, we are going to build a car and team to compete in what promises to be a fiercely-contested championship as we seek to begin a successful record together.”
https://sportscar365.com/lemans/wec/peu ... rtnership/

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 07:37 am
by Cheeveer
that's good

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2019 18:09 pm
by erwin greven
Le Mans Hypercar: Where Things Stand & Your Questions Answered

Whose in and when?

6 December 2019, 3:50 PM

Image

After 24 hours of no little confusion with some conflicting messages caused by a somewhat ill-focused FIA communique, there’s relative calm today as the various questions raised yesterday are cleared up.


Let’s run through them briefly:


Does the need for an “homologated car” mean that there must be roadgoing versions of the race car?

No. All current LMP race cars are homologated and all have a ‘technical passport’ which is used both in the approval process and in technical checks on the cars during race meetings. This aspect of the regulations is not a change from the norm.

It should be added though that with the exception of the Peugeot programme, all currently known Hypercar programmes do intend to build and market road-going versions of their race cars.


Does a Le Mans Hypercar programme need to be a factory effort?

No, but it does need to have a link to a manufacturer (though the definition of ‘manufacturer’ is not yet clear).

There must be a declaration from the allied manufacturer on their approval and on any commitment made to the Championship and programme. It is not clear whether an engine supplier would be permitted to make such a declaration, but it seems likely that if they were to do so the car would have to be named, at least in part, to that manufacturer.

There is (not unusually) a ‘catch-all’ in the regulations that gives final approval to the Endurance Committee.

Incidentally this regulation is very close to that which defines what can, and cannot, be a DPi in IMSA racing.


Does that regulation mean that any of the currently known programmes will not be permitted?

Toyota and Aston Martin are automotive manufacturers. Glickenhaus is a registered manufacturer in their home market and look set to sign an OEM engine supply deal.

Peugeot too is an automotive manufacturer

Little is know of the details of the ByKolles programme, but it would need to comply and/or satisfy the Endurance committee of that compliance.


Does that mean that customer cars are not permitted?

No. Our understanding is that the declaration from a manufacturer would cover any customer cars too. The homologation would, of course, be identical.



So where does that currently leave the teams that have currently committed and/or made any form of declaration of interest?

Toyota Gazoo Racing

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Toyota is committed for 2020/21 with two GR Super Sport cars. These will be pure racing prototype chassis with front axle hybrid drive. There will be a road car version of the race car.

There are no indication of plans for customer cars as yet.

A road-car ‘mule’ has been seen testing but the race car will not test until post Le Mans 2020.


Aston Martin

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Aston Martin will enter two race versions of the Aston Martin Valkyrie, built by Multimatic, powered by a Cosworth V12 engine that features no hybrid system.

The Valkyrie will be road car based. The road car has been testing recently but the race version will be on similar programme to the Toyota (see above).

Aston Martin say nothing has changed since the programme announcement at Le Mans last year. The project is on track though development deadlines, as for all of the programmes, are tight


R-Motorsport

Initial signs of a two-car Season 1 Hypercar effort with customer Valkyries have cooled somewhat, but it is still possible that we could see an R-Motorsport Valkyrie during 2020/21. The programme seems to have slipped somewhat as the race is on to build and develop the first cars.

The 
team promises information soon on its 2020 plans


Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus

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Glickenhaus is commited from 2020/21. It will bring two SCG 007 cars to the entry, racing prototype chassis, though with a roadgoing equivalent which will feature a more road-optiomised chassis/tub. The car will feature a twin-turbo V6 powerplant (believed to be an Alfa Romeo unit). Like Aston’s Valkyrie, it will not be hybrid powered.

Race cars are to be built by long-time Glickenhaus partner Podium Engineering in Italy with an engine builder/ tuner already appointed.


ByKolles Racing

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There is very limited information available for ByKolles’ planned 2020/21 programme. The former WEC LMP1 team is known to be working on an hybrid-drivetrain Hypercar programme.

Most recent communication indicates that the car will be revealed at Le Mans in 2020. Previously it has stated publicly that it intends to race its CLM P1/01 grandfathered into the top class during the first season of Hypercar alongside its new challenger.


Ginetta

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The current G60-LT-P1 cars are available for customers to enter in the 2020/21 FIA WEC, the Ginetta team encouraged by both the car’s speed and reliability.

Current expectation is for at least one season of grandfathered current LMP1 non-hybrids.

Beyond that the Yorkshire, UK-based outfit is known to be talking to a number of parties interested in a future Hypercar programme.


Rebellion Racing

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See below for the Swiss team’s newly announced hook-up with Peugeot.

No news yet though of whether we will see the current R13 continue in grandfathered form for next season (or indeed beyond) before the Peugeot Hypercar comes on stream.


SMP Racing

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There is no news either of any resurrection of the BR1 LMP1 programme which showed real promise in 2018/19.


Peugeot

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2022/23 (though looking likely to request a start towards end of 2021/22 season including Le Mans). The appeal of the centenary of the Le Mans 24 Hours in 2023 is clearly a major determining factor for Peugeot.

Factory entry with hybrid powertrain.Confirmed partnership with Rebellion Racing. No confirmation as yet on any deal with ORECA.


Brabham

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Most recent statements from the newly forged Brabham Automotive outfit are that they are now focusing on the Hypercar class (likely with a revised version of the BT62) rather than GTE.

There is no indication as yet on full commitment, or indeed when that commitment would be aimed at delivering a race programme.


Gordon Murray Automotive

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The design guru and ‘father’ of the last road going ‘Hypercar’ to win Le Mans (the McLaren F1) Gordon Murray, has said publicly that he is evaluating the new regulations for a potential race programme for his forthcoming T.50 road car.

Again there are no specific details of any programme as yet


Ford

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The interesting dynamic here is the potential within Hypercar for a hybrid drivetrain and a reported reluctance within the group of potential DPi 2.0 manufacturers to commit to electrification.

On the face of it that leaves three available options for Ford: 1. Persuade IMSA to go down the hybrid route, at least as an option. 2. Look towards Hypercar and work for an agreement for a unified top class at the signature events. 3. Do nothing in endurance racing.


McLaren

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It’s all quiet on the McLaren front once again – with few signs of an imminent commitment anywhere.

 But an upturn, at least to some degree, in F1 form, and movement on the commercial front for the F1 team too is a good omen.


Alpine

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No news of late but there are parties involved that would like to see progress. Could the Le Mans centenary be a prime motivator in bringing together a programme for the partly state-owned company (Renault)?


Aurus/G-Drive

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Auris has no firm news beyond a wish to be involved at some point in the top class. Hypercar has been mentioned several times in conversation and public statements but with no firm plan announced.

Speaksing to DSC recently, Roman Rusinov said: “I cannot say we (G-Drive/Aurus) will do LMP1 (or race in the top class) next year.

“It would not be intelligent from my side, because it’s a much more complex set of decisions. But what we will do in Le Mans for the next two years has to be decided soon.”


And beyond?

A number of major OEMS are keeping a watching brief. But, a combination of factors are preventing more marques coming forward.

These include the over-arching reluctance of the automotive industry to commit to programmes, some specific company-related policies from some, and continuing confusion with reference to Hypercar/ DPi 2.0′ they are all playing a part.
http://www.dailysportscar.com/2019/12/0 ... wered.html

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2019 20:46 pm
by Cheeveer
Hypercar better fucking work.

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Mon Dec 09, 2019 22:29 pm
by erwin greven
Vincent Beaumesnil On The Le Mans Hypercar Regulations
ACO Sporting Director speaks to DSC - on manufacturer links, future interest, and impact on currently known programmes

9 December 2019, 4:50 PM

After a hectic week in sportscar racing news ACO Sporting Director, Vincent Beaumesnil took time out yesterday to speak to the DSC Editor to add further detail and clarity on the specifics of the newly announced aspects of the 2020 Le Mans Hypercar regulations.

It was an interesting and revealing insight into the thought process behind a ruleset that has attracted no little negative comment in recent days.

It does require some patience to work through the philosophy, but there are two truly key points made in the interview below:

The rule is intended to help expand the grid, and not to provide a roadblock to entrants, and, there is no current known and/ or planned Hypercar programme that it would impact negatively.

Read on and look out for the full interview with Vincent Beaumesnil as part of a forthcoming episode of the Inside the Sportscar Paddock podcast.

Can you explain the philosophy of the rule that’s now been introduced for this linkage with a car brand?

“Of course. The first thing I want to say is that you must be very focused on what is written in the announcement from the ACO.

“We have introduced some rules that will enforce cars to enter under an automotive brand. When we speak about the brand, we don’t require a manufacturer to commit itself, but in the philosophy perhaps of Alpine and Aurus in LMP2.

“We believe today that by encouraging this we will also bring some more support to private teams and to expand the field of cars racing (in the top class).

“We think that the concept of it basically is to have the most extreme cars in the world that we see on the road and also to provide the fans and the media cars that they can clearly identify as a brand. We know that brands are very popular, and we introduced this system to encourage this.

“Obviously, our intention is to be quite flexible with this because we don’t want to produce too strict parameters in terms of production volumes or whatever because many car brands today are very small volumes in the field of hypercars and we don’t want these very small companies very committed to building hypercars to be out of the game.

“So, this is why we are introducing this principle and also why it will be left at the discretion of the Endurance Commission for evaluation of hypercar projects on a case by case basis.

That principle of leaving the ‘catch-all’ with the Endurance Commission, presumably is left in there for a positive reason, to find a way to get the cars onto the grid rather than to find a reason not to?

“Exactly, it is to make sure that we have something which is in line with our intention and principles.

“The only intention is to provide some support to the teams, to provide some opportunities of securing nice brands coming to the game and we feel that our fans and media have a great expectation on this.

So, to be clear here the proviso is that a car brand must be linked to every programme. What they do with that link is subject to a declaration from the brand and then subject to approval from the Endurance Committee that might be marketing-led, it might be an engine supply. It might be that it’s a manufacturer with some kind of alliance with a private team.

“Yes, there is no specific requirement on that aspect. The final intention is that when we see the car you will understand that this car recognisably belongs to, or is allied to, a brand. And we will work on the creation of the design as well.

“As to how people get together to achieve this, that is left to their own discretion of course. In the philosophy of what Aurus and Alpine are doing in LMP2, clearly we can see here the opportunities that it brings for a brand, and for a team.”

About Aurus and Alpine, is this, at least in part encouragement to those brands, and maybe to others too, to look towards hypercar rather than LMP2 in the future?

“The original intention is not especially for that but that could be a positive after-effect as well actually yes.”

Okay, moving on to smaller brands, it’s called Le Mans Hypercar, and we have heard from Gordon Murray, we’ve heard from Brabham. They’re now looking towards Le Mans Hypercar as a possible programme to promote their brands.

But before we get into those future possibilities, we’ve got a couple of other smaller brands, one of which is currently producing road cars, one of which isn’t but has said that they are going to. Is there anything in the current regulations as we now see them that will stop Jim Glickenhaus or indeed Colin Kolles from going forward with the programmes that we know they’ve got under development?


“At the moment there is no blocking point. As you know, Glickenhaus is already, today, building some road cars, so obviously the Endurance Commission is aware of that too and will make a proper examination of the entry when we will have everything together to take into account the fact that Glickenhaus is producing road cars so could be considered as the car brand.

“For ByKolles I would use the example of the Ford GT. At some stage, you need to try to be clever in order to help the sport and you will remember that the Ford GT was racing before you could buy it from a showroom.

“If we would have been not flexible enough to find a way to make this entry and to get some guarantees of the future arrival of the road cars on the market we would not have had this car on the grid and that would have been damaging for the sport.

“So, this is the way we are managing the question with ByKolles. They have announced that in parallel with their Hypercar race programme there will be some road cars produced, so it is part of the project. We know that and it’s exactly the same approach as for Ford.”

The final question to do with next season. We’ve already heard from you at Sebring earlier this year that we’re likely to see, to bolster the field, grandfathered LMP1s. Where do we currently stand on that? Will this rule have to apply there as well? We know Ginetta clearly is a car brand. But do the same rules apply to any teams wanting to come forward with it with a grandfathered LMP1 at present?

“No, they will continue to operate under an entirely different ruleset, the rules we are discussing apply only to Hypercars.”

Moving on now to the somewhat surprising announcement from Peugeot, certainly in terms of its timing.

Their announcement makes it clear that they were attracted by the option to field a car with a hybrid drivetrain, but also, attracted by something else which this class has got to offer, which is a link to the centenary race in 2023.


“You’d better ask Peugeot about that directly but as you know we have been working with them for a long time on them coming back to us. You’ll remember that we have been very committed two years ago, already to this mission with Peugeot.

“Finally, we did not expect it to happen when it did. In the meantime, though we have been changing our concept, keeping them informed and, in particular with the very strong results we have had in reducing budgets because we know that the sport is changing.

“In the past what we had with LMP1 is not something that we are able to have any more with manufacturers committing. So I think the possibility to promote the brand in the top class of Le Mans and WEC at the budgets we now have for Hypercar is a unique opportunity for a manufacturer. Having this new concept on the table has made it quite quick and efficient for them to convince their Board.”

We’ve now got a lineup of hypercars for season one and in the case of Peugeot for season three, and we gather they may, depending on the way that programme comes, ask for maybe a potential start at the end of season two. How healthy is the interest level beyond what we already know Vincent?

“Very good! For sure we, as you know, work in the background with a wide range of potential competitors as we have done in the past years. Because as you imagine, people like Aston Martin, Peugeot and Glickenhaus, we are starting a discussion with them many months before the announcement.

“I am quite confident that there is more to come.”

Let’s also talk a little bit about LMP2. You also made the final announcement as part of the communique from the ACO this week, about the package that will apply to have the current LMP2s falling into line with the revised performance of the Le Mans Hypercars.

It will be 30 kilowatts less power. It will be a spec tire supplier. Just give us a flavour of the discussions you’ve had with the LMP2 manufacturers and teams about that range of measures.


“First of all, it is important to say that with the revised performance of the Hypercars (as compared to LMP1) we had to consider refining the performance of the LMP2s. It’s actually not a big drop in performance for the LMP2s. The cars will be quite close to what we have today.

“We have had many discussions with both the teams and the manufacturers on this so I would say it was really teamwork to make the right decision taking into account both the technical and financial aspects. We are not touching at all the chassis, which is the best approach for the team.

“The performance reduction has to be achieved by a combination of parameters because if you are too brutal on one parameter, this will affect the category too much. So, here we have a drop of power but if we had worked only on power reduction we would have probably got some top speed issues with the cars racing with the GTEs.

“So, with this figure, we still have cars that in their drivability, make the overtaking in traffic still comfortable for drivers.

“So the rest of the performance, we had to find it through tyres and this is achievable obviously only if we have a unique tyre manufacturer – this was the main reason. And with this, we have really found a good balance that keeps the LMP2s very close to what we have today.

“It’s a very successful formula for the drivers and the teams and we wanted to keep this balance and by making a combination of engine and tyres we have been able to keep this balance very close to what we have today.”

Two final questions, both about hypercar. The first is a final clarification. Are you aware of a single programme, at all, that would be negatively affected by the ruleset we heard this week?

“Absolutely no, not at all.

Do you see this as being something that privateer teams will see as a positive moving forward?

“Obviously, we need to explain clearly to everybody that these rules are here to encourage new projects and not to restrict them.

“People need to understand also that this system will be a way to pull the category up in it strengths on the marketing side and communication side, the ability we have to have more fans, not only the fans that we have today to bring a wider audience of people. This is really the target.”

Final question and the other hot topic about the top class of endurance racing has been for some time the fact that we’ve got these two parallel processes with the ACO/ FIA with Le Mans Hypercar, and we’ve got DPI in the United States.

Both have had their successes, both have had their challenges. Are we going to see continued discussions about the potential for those two rulesets to come together to some degree, at least?


“IMSA and ACO have been partners for many years now.

“This was the Don Panoz heritage that we have been continuing together with our friends at IMSA and NASCAR.

“We are connected with them nearly every day with them speaking about our projects and what we do so we are still in permanent evaluation of how we can make our sport better, progressing together.”
http://www.dailysportscar.com/2019/12/0 ... tions.html

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 08:02 am
by erwin greven
Mazda, Cadillac Not Interested in DPi Hybrid Integration

Two-thirds of current DPi grid not interested in DPi integration into next-gen ruleset…


Two of the three current DPi manufacturers in the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship revealed they have no interest in the addition of hybrid powertrains into the next-generation formula, although admitting it wouldn’t be a “dealbreaker” as long as costs remain under control.

Both Mazda and Cadillac have publicly stated their views in IMSA’s planned integration of a spec hybrid powertrain into the so-called DPi 2022 regulations.

It comes following a tender initiated by the sanctioning body for a single-specification system, with costs having been proposed at one time to be in the range of $100,000.

While former IMSA President Scott Atherton confirmed plans to adopt hybrid technology during last year’s ‘State of the Series’ address, his successor, former Mazda Motorsports director John Doonan, is known to have been a proponent of cost containment.


When asked by Sportscar365, Mazda’s new motorsports boss Nelson Cosgrove echoed his company’s beliefs.

“From a Mazda standpoint and our cycle plan, we believe from the top down that there’s still a lot to get with internal combustion engines,” Cosgrove said.

“We feel an ICE engine [only] is where we’d probably prefer to be. But if it was a spec hybrid system and that’s what the series went with, I don’t think it’s a dealbreaker.”

Cosgrove has expressed concern of potential complications when adding hybrids to the mix.

“Moro-san [Masahiro Moro, Mazda North America CEO] has an interesting philosophy,” Cosgrove said.

“The ICE is pretty well understood how to control it. [Full] electric is pretty well understood how to control it. If you mix those two things together, it gets really difficult.”


GM Racing director Mark Kent shared similar beliefs to Cosgrove and Mazda, particularly with the production path Cadillac is headed.

The luxury automaker is set to concentrate on all-electric vehicles in its roadmap, having recently eliminated several hybrid models from its lineup.

“We are going all-electric,” Kent told Sportscar365 in October. “We’re not headed down a hybrid path.

“If it’s good for the series, if it will help the series, then we’ll support it.

“But our position has been that it’s got to be a spec system that we don’t get into a spending war on technology on hybridization. What is the right system and does it make sense?

“IMSA’s doing their due diligence on what’s possible and we look forward to what they come back with and see if it’s something we can support.”

Cosgrove said that there’s been “a lot to unpack” in recent DPi 2022 steering committee group meetings that are shaping the new-gen regulations.

It comes amid a likely convergence with the FIA and ACO’s Hypercar platform that would allow the different platforms to race in the same class through a Balance of Performance system.

Despite having initially been mandatory, hybrids have become optional in the Hypercar platform.

“It’s an interesting conversation,” Cosgrove said. “We’ve taken the approach that DPi 1.0 is one package onto itself DPi 2022 package is almost a different project. We’re going to have to evaluate where that is.

“I think it’s very exciting. Some of the items they’re talking about is super exciting, taking what we’ve done up to this point as a cohort of manufacturers and expanding on that would be a lot of fun.”

IMSA’s Doonan, meanwhile, has confirmed that a decision on the spec hybrid system, which was put up for tender last year, has not yet been made.

“We did an RFP (request for proposal) to hybrid providers,” he said.

“Now we can work with real costs and talk to those who have put their money where their mouth is and invested and are currently running with us if that’s the direction they think that will allow to tell their particular brand story the best.”


TRD: Hybrid Needed to Promote Relevancy

Hybrids will become a necessity in nearly all forms of motorsport according to Toyota Racing Development president and general manager David Wilson, who through Lexus Racing has been involved in DPi 2022 talks.

“All things being the same, we’re supportive of a hybrid component,” Wilson told Sportscar365.

“I know, because I have a foot in the NASCAR technological revolution that’s going on right now, there’s also the vision in that camp to have a hybrid component.

“We’ve discussed theoretically and hypothetically an ideal technical solution would be one that isn’t necessarily the same solution, because the cars are so different, but perhaps one that creates some efficiencies between the two series.

“Even on the IndyCar side, talk to Jay Frye about where that sport is going.

“The common denominator between every form of motorsport is the need for greater relevancy and hybridization and electrification is on everybody’s radar.”

Wilson said Lexus’ preference would be to have a “creditable” system that would do more than deploying electric power on pit lane and instead play a factor in the strategy of the race.

“If we’re going to go down this path, we want to store a significant amount of energy to be able to deploy it over the course of a race in a strategic manner. Can we do that with an off-the-shelf spec system and do it in a safe way?” he said.

Wilson has suggested the idea of potentially delaying the introduction of hybrids into DPi by a year or two, but having the infrastructure in place where it could be easily bolted-on to cars when the technology catches up.

“The good news is that, as we speak, the development continues to move forward every day,” he said.

“You can only believe that with that in mind, maybe it slips a year. And if it slips a year, it provides us a better solution overall and we can rationalize as an industry.”

Lexus is one of at least a half-dozen manufacturers currently not in DPi that are evaluating potential programs for the future.
https://sportscar365.com/imsa/iwsc/mazd ... tegration/

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Wed Jan 22, 2020 13:21 pm
by erwin greven
Marshal Pruett wrote:A time of reckoning for global prototypes

As professional endurance racing awakens and comes together this week for its first race of the year in Florida, participants will have an intriguing topic to debate during the long days and nights at Daytona International Speedway.

If the impending convergence of prototype rules between IMSA, the Automobile Club de l’Ouest, and FIA World Endurance Championship is going to happen as anticipated, there’s only one path to consider. And while we don’t know the details of what’s likely to emerge, pain and sacrifice will be required by some of the three sanctioning bodies if they want convergence to succeed.

With IMSA’s LMP2-based Daytona Prototype internationals positioned as North America’s top category for the next decade, and the ACO/FIA WEC’s upcoming Hypercar formula, which welcomes purebred prototypes and road-based supercars in September as its leading category starting, diverging ideologies and timelines would be the first orders of business to reconcile.

Some have suggested convergence should involve a blending of houses. Take Hypercars, which are set to start competing in eight months at the 2020-2021 FIA WEC season-opener in Silverstone, and IMSA’s second-generation DPis, which debut in competition two years from now at Daytona in January of 2022, and put them together in a unified class. If that’s the road the trio choose to follow, convergence is a failure waiting to happen.

For a meaningful French-American partnership to work, one formula will need to die, and for some incredibly pragmatic reasons, it can’t be DPi. For those who’ve championed a blended solution where Hypercars and DPis share the track and race wheel-to-wheel using Balance of Performance rules to equalize the machines, a key problem stands out.

With a huge disparity in estimated annual costs to field Hypercars and next-gen DPis, IMSA’s formula becomes the obvious option to pursue. Not because it’s better or more exciting than Hypercar, to be clear. I’m more interested in seeing new Hypercars in action than DPi 2.0, for whatever that’s worth. DPi is more affordable, and by a mile, which holds the greatest attraction for the majority of today’s auto manufacturers.

The death or decline of top-level prototype racing has always come as a result of unchecked costs, and with a quick comparison of probable DPi 2.0 and Hypercar expenditures, the ACO/WEC formula would be untenable for IMSA’s manufacturers and teams.

High costs killed IMSA’s glorious GTPs due to runaway budgetary needs for auto manufacturers and privateer entrants alike. GTP’s European counterpart, Group C, and its short-lived successor, the World Sports Car Championship, crumbled for the same reason. When the American Le Mans Series and Grand-Am merged as IMSA in 2014, LMP1 was the one significant category cut from the multi-class roster for price alone. The WEC’s incredible LMP1-Hybrid formula was among the greatest offerings sports car fans have received, but it also collapsed under the weight of runaway costs. The pitfalls, in this regard, are well known.

With Hypercar, the WEC has done its best to bring the annual running costs down from LMP1-H’s great excess, which reached hundreds of millions per year when Audi and Porsche were spending Formula 1-level dollars, to something far more sustainable. The WEC estimates a minimum annual Hypercar budget to run in the $22 million range for two cars, which does not include the price to create and develop a car by the factories.

And while this $22 million figure is a giant reduction from LMP1-H’s peak, yearly Hypercar budgets would continue to vastly exceed the price to play with DPis. A stout single-car DPi budget has reached $6 million per year, and depending on whether it’s a factory or customer program, a two-car effort can fall in the $10-12 million range. Like Hypercar, there’s no budget cap in place, meaning huge sums could be spent by DPi manufacturers if desired, but the rules for both classes are written to keep the silliness in check. The silliness, though, is relative.

Where the two formulas also find little common ground is in the costs to create their cars. What will the final bill look like for Aston Martin’s Valkyrie Hypercar? Or Toyota’s Hypercar, which takes most of its TS050 LMP1-H technology and repackages it in a slightly different shape? On the creation side, matching or exceeding the $22 million minimum it will take to run those cars seems like a safe bet. Whatever the numbers happen to be, we know they are significant, and will dwarf the costs of creating new DPi models for 2022.

Estimates to take a DPi from concept to creation fall in the $6-8 million range, and coupled with the $10-12 million minimum to field a pair of DPis, today’s cost-conscious manufacturers will gravitate towards value.

If lap times are balanced through technical regulations, and increased road-car styling cues are brought forth as promised with IMSA’s DPi 2.0s, the argument in manufacturer board rooms to spend double or more on Hypercars will falter in most cases. Even if the ACO/WEC and IMSA elect to keep both formulas, the majority of manufacturers will build DPis as going for the overall win at Le Mans at a 50-percent savings is the smartest decision to make.

And that’s where DPi elevates itself as the winning formula to support from the outset of convergence.

If a single DPi formula were to be adopted by the three sanctioning bodies, what would happen to Hypercar? This one is harder to answer. The clock is ticking on its September WEC debut, and with IMSA’s new formula two years away, hitting the pause button on Hypercar to wait on DPi 2.0 doesn’t sound feasible.

And do we think two proud French sports car organizations would actually halt their years-in-the-making Hypercar formula before it debuts, announce the money spent by manufacturers on the cars they’re readying for testing as we speak was wasted, and extend the current LMP1 formula until DPi 2.0 materializes? Not a chance. Hypercar is happening, which is awesome.

Where it might fit into the future, however, is ripe for some heated politicking, provided the three sides opt for a single formula based on DPi 2.0. And how would boutique Hypercar constructors like Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus and other low-volume manufacturers be affected by a short-lived 2020-2021 WEC campaign followed by convergence?

That would be the toughest pill to swallow if IMSA’s formula is chosen. Big expense, and an even bigger effort, to put Hypercars in motion for one championship run, followed by a new top class using IMSA’s prototype rules? As I said in the beginning, only one formula makes sense in convergence, and if it comes to pass, those on the side of the unchosen formula will suffer all the wounds.

I’m left to wonder whether Hypercar, with its rules altered where only road-going supercars form the basis of the class, would make for an epic update to the teetering GTE/GT Le Mans formula. On both sides of the Atlantic, car counts in the factory GT classes aren’t nearly as strong as they once were.

Could morphing Hypercar and GTE/GTLM into the new and leading GT class for IMSA and the WEC in 2022 be considered as a worthy option? One that would preserve entrants like Jim Glickenhaus while maintaining the traditional homes for Aston Martin, BMW, Corvette, Ferrari, and Porsche, if they stay in Hypercar/GTE/GTLM? Transitioning Hypercar from LMP1’s replacement to a proper GT category could jump start the ageing platform. It wouldn’t be a crazy proposition to float to the current and incoming manufacturers.

Convergence could work wonders for global endurance racing. The strongest versions of IMSA – in its original guise – the ALMS, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans I’ve witnessed in my lifetime have been when the parties commit to finding common regulatory ground.

My fear for a convergence that protects two formulas comes from how much it would feel like the ACO/WEC and IMSA have entered marriage with prenuptial agreements. If both sides start the relationship looking to safeguard their core assets and interest by keeping Hypercar and DPi 2.0 once 2022 arrives, divorce is always an easy and lossless option to use.

A bold commitment to doing what’s best from the outset, with the lone formula everyone can afford, is the only way to converge.
https://racer.com/2020/01/21/pruett-a-t ... rototypes/

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Thu Jan 23, 2020 22:00 pm
by erwin greven
IMSA, ACO Set for Friday Convergence Announcement

IMSA, ACO set to announce prototype convergence Friday in Daytona…


IMSA and the ACO are set to confirm plans for convergence in top-class prototype racing, with an announcement scheduled at Daytona International Speedway for tomorrow morning.

The ACO issued a media advisory that will see an announcement at 11:45 a.m. ET on Friday between ACO President Pierre Fillon and IMSA Chairman Jim France.

The announcement will be held in the Daytona International Speedway drivers meeting room, which can accommodate hundreds of people.

While no further details were communicated in the bulletin, Sportscar365 understands it will formally confirm plans that DPi’s next-generation platform will be eligible alongside the FIA and ACO’s Le Mans Hypercar formula beginning in 2022.

Series executives from both organizations met on Thursday in Daytona to finalize details of the arrangement, which has been in the works for the better part of six months.

A meeting in Miami in December is understood to have resulted in a provisional agreement, which will see the same set of top-class prototypes be eligible to compete in the Rolex 24 at Daytona, Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring and 24 Hours of Le Mans for the first time in decades.

Technical details are not expected to be revealed tomorrow, with IMSA yet to finalize regulations for its so-called DPi 2022 ruleset, largely due to the recent efforts to bring the two platforms together in terms of performance.

The Hypercar class is set to debut in the 2020-21 FIA World Endurance Championship season in September, with Toyota, Aston Martin and Glickenhaus the only confirmed teams for the launch season, with Peugeot confirmed to enter in 2022.

The FIA and ACO announced a five-year commitment for its formula, which is open to both prototype-based and production car-based cars with optional hybrid powertrains.

IMSA’s current-generation DPi formula, meanwhile, will remain in the WeatherTech Championship through the end of the 2021 season, prior to the introduction of its next-generation platform.

A spec hybrid system has been planned to be incorporated into IMSA’s new DPi formula, although a single-supplier has not yet been chosen.
https://sportscar365.com/lemans/wec/ims ... ouncement/

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Fri Jan 24, 2020 18:24 pm
by erwin greven
ACO and IMSA forge future of endurance racing

Image
Jim France (left), Chairman of IMSA and Pierre Fillon, President of the ACO

The ACO and North America’s sanctioning body for endurance racing, the International Motor Sports Association (IMSA), have today announced that agreement has been reached for a common future with convergence of the top categories of endurance racing.

On the occasion of the 2020 Rolex 24 At Daytona, the two sanctioning bodies unveiled the guiding principle for this platform – the introduction as the top category of competition of LMDh, which will be eligible for both the FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC) and the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship. This joint platform responds to the wishes of numerous manufacturers.



The chance for automotive manufacturers to compete with the same car at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Rolex 24 At Daytona, at SuperSebring or at Spa-Francorchamps, at the Motul Petit Le Mans or even Silverstone, will soon become a reality.

The ACO and IMSA have together established the basis for joint regulations to govern the new LMDh category. The objective is that, from September 2021 in the FIA WEC and from January 2022 in the WeatherTech Championship, manufacturers will be able to enter the top category and compete in the two leading championships in endurance racing with this new model of car, LMDh.

The two sanctioning bodies were inspired by elements from each of their respective regulations, namely from the ACO’s Le Mans Hypercar and those in preparation by IMSA for the DPi 2.0.

The result of this convergence, the LMDh car will be:

• Based on a new chassis common to both ACO and IMSA, using elements of the Le Mans Hypercar and LMP2 chassis, and built by the four current LMP2 manufacturers: Dallara, Ligier, Multimatic and Oreca. This chassis will also be used for the new generation LMP2.
• The car will use a common hybrid KERS system, on the rear axle.
• Its silhouette and design will be modifiable, developed according to the brand or style of the manufacturer which will provide the engine power for the car

More technical details for the car will be revealed in March at SuperSebring, in a presentation from the ACO and IMSA Technical Departments.

In the future the top category of endurance racing will include both LMDh and Le Mans Hypercar. A balance of performance system will ensure fair competition.

Pierre Fillon, President of the ACO: “This announcement today is the crucial starting point for a joint endurance racing future, supported by both the ACO and IMSA. The platform represents the convergence achieved by both organisations which is a great success story for endurance racing. A manufacturer will soon be able to compete in the top category of two championships, the FIA WEC and the WeatherTech Championship. We can’t emphasise enough, as it’s exceptional, how many opportunities this long-term sporting and marketing vision will open up.”

Jim France, IMSA Chairman: “When my father, Bill France Sr., brought the first Daytona Continental sports car race here to Daytona International Speedway back in 1962, he wanted to bring together sports car drivers, teams and manufacturers from around the world. With the ACO, IMSA and manufacturers aligned, today’s announcement proudly takes my father’s vision to the next level.”

Gérard Neveu, CEO of the FIA World Endurance Championship: “The big winner today is endurance racing as the door is now opened to many additional competitors to compete at the highest level on both sides of the Atlantic with the same car. The two sanctioning bodies should be congratulated for their vision and spirit of collaboration. Le Mans Hypercars and the new LMDh cars racing together at Le Mans or Daytona will be an incredibly exciting prospect for endurance fans across the world.”

John Doonan, IMSA President: “On the eve of IMSA’s 51st season of competition, future race fans will regard today as one of the most significant of all time for IMSA, the ACO and the world of sports car racing. Providing a common platform for top-level prototype racing globally has been a goal for the sanctioning bodies, our manufacturers – and most importantly, sports car racing fans everywhere – for many years, and we are proud to say the opportunity has finally arrived. We are grateful for the collaboration with our partners at the ACO and the open dialogue with our manufacturer partners that led us to today’s introduction of the LMDh platform.”
https://www.fiawec.com/en/news/aco-and- ... ?preview=1

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Fri Jan 24, 2020 21:23 pm
by erwin greven
Marshal Pruett wrote:IMSA and ACO sign prototype convergence agreement

IMSA and the Automobile Club l’Ouest have entered into an agreement that will allow both organizations to compete with their top prototype classes at North American WeatherTech SportsCar Championship events and at the ACO’s legendary 24 Hours of Le Mans in France.

The heart of the partnership involves combining the upcoming 2020 Le Mans Hypercar class and a new formula named LMDh which comes online in 2021. Hypercar and LMDh will race together in a single, blended class, which relies on Balance of Performance equalization.

The LMDh formula, which stands for Le Mans Daytona (and awaits confirmation of how the ‘h’ will be defined), is scheduled for a staggered rollout. LMDh will debut in September of 2021 alongside Hypercar in Europe, and in IMSA, LMDh will replace the current DPi formula in January of 2022 at the onset of the new WeatherTech Championship season.

“When my father, Bill France Sr., brought the first Daytona Continental sports car race here to Daytona International Speedway back in 1962, he wanted to bring together sports car drivers, teams and manufacturers from around the world,” said Jim France, IMSA co-founder and chairman. “With the ACO, IMSA and manufacturers aligned, today’s announcement proudly takes my father’s vision to the next level.”

ACO president Pierre Fillon, who has become close allies with his American counterpart, shares those views on where convergence can take global endurance racing.

“This announcement today is the crucial starting point for a joint endurance racing future, supported by both the ACO and IMSA,” he said. “The platform represents the convergence achieved by both organizations which is a great success story for endurance racing. A manufacturer will soon be able to compete in the top category of two championships, the FIA WEC and the WeatherTech Championship. We can’t emphasize enough, as it’s exceptional, how many opportunities this long-term sporting and marketing vision will open up.”

Although the joint press release cites the ability for Hypercar and LMDh entries to contest any and all IMSA and FIA World Endurance Championship events once convergence takes place, the FIA is not listed as a signatory in the agreement, which suggests a direct engagement has been made between IMSA and the ACO.

WEC president Gerard Neveu, however, has offered an encouraging message on where he expects convergence to lead within the FIA.

“The big winner today is endurance racing, as the door is now opened to many additional competitors to compete at the highest level on both sides of the Atlantic with the same car,” he said. “The two sanctioning bodies should be congratulated for their vision and spirit of collaboration. Le Mans Hypercars and the new LMDh cars racing together at Le Mans or Daytona will be an incredibly exciting prospect for endurance fans across the world.”

It’s believed convergence plans will be put to a vote at the next FIA World Motorsport Council meeting, where Hypercar and LMDh would potentially be ratified for the 2021-2022 WEC calendar.

A name for the class where Hypercars and LMDhs will vie for overall wins is expected to be revealed, along with the technical regulations for the new formula, at March’s Super Sebring event where IMSA and the WEC serve as co-headliners.

Convergence between IMSA and the ACO comes at the request of numerous auto manufacturers who implored the storied organizations to find a common ground with prototypes.

Despite multiple failed attempts to create a platform where IMSA’s DPi formula would be permitted to race at Le Mans, including the most recent stall that emerged at Sebring in 2019, the leaders at both organizations kept a channel of open communication going behind the scenes. Former IMSA president Scott Atherton played a significant role in advancing the topic to where it stands today, and with successor John Doonan taking the reins one month ago, convergence was finally taken across the finish line with the ACO.

“On the eve of IMSA’s 51st season of competition, future race fans will regard today as one of the most significant of all time for IMSA, the ACO and the world of sports car racing,” Doonan said. “Providing a common platform for top-level prototype racing globally has been a goal for the sanctioning bodies, our manufacturers — and most importantly, sports car racing fans everywhere — for many years, and we are proud to say the opportunity has finally arrived. We are grateful for the collaboration with our partners at the ACO and the open dialogue with our manufacturer partners that led us to today’s introduction of the LMDh platform.”
https://racer.com/2020/01/24/imsa-and-a ... agreement/
IMSA & ACO Agree Route To Top Class Prototype Convergence

The most significant announcement of the modern era in Sportscar racing

24 January 2020

IMSA and the Automobile Club l’Ouest have confirmed today that they have entered into an agreement that will bring the potential for both the ACO ‘Hypercars’ and the next generation of DPi machinery to compete together in a unified top class in races for both the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship and in the FIA WEC, including the Le Mans 24 Hours.

The agreement sees a small but potentially seismic shift in the timeline for introduction of the second generation of DPi machinery allowing full season second generation ‘DPi’ machinery (to be renamed LMDh) to compete in the full 2021/22 FIA WEC alongside the ACO-regulated Le Mans ‘Hypercars’ – Hypercar and LMDh will be able to race together in a single class, with Balance of Performance set to be used to provide a level playing field.

IMSA meanwhile will completely replace the current generation of DPi machinery with LMDh from the start of their 2022 season with a discussion still open as to whether the ACO-Le Mans Hypercars will be eligible in IMSA races,

The LMDh formula, which stands for Le Mans Daytona (and awaits confirmation of how the ‘h’ will be defined), is scheduled for a staggered rollout. LMDh will debut in September of 2021 alongside Hypercars in Europe, and in IMSA, LMDh will replace the current DPi formula in January of 2022 at the onset of the new WeatherTech Championship season.

The conference, held at Daytona, featured a room full of key players including: Porsche, Hyundai, Lamborghini, Ferrari, Michelin, Ligier, ORECA, BMW, Caddy, Dallara, Audi, Multimatic and Lexus.

Jim France – IMSA co-founder and Chairman:


“When my father, Bill France Sr., brought the first Daytona Continental sports car race here to Daytona International Speedway back in 1962, he wanted to bring together sports car drivers, teams and manufacturers from around the world.

“With the ACO, IMSA and manufacturers aligned, today’s announcement proudly takes my father’s vision to the next level.”

ACO President Pierre Fillon, understood by DSC to have been a major driver for the current convergence agreement said:

“This announcement today is the crucial starting point for a joint endurance racing future, supported by both the ACO and IMSA.

“The platform represents the convergence achieved by both organizations which is a great success story for endurance racing. A manufacturer will soon be able to compete in the top category of two championships, the FIA WEC and the WeatherTech Championship. We can’t emphasise enough, as it’s exceptional, how many opportunities this long-term sporting and marketing vision will open up.”

WEC Managing Director Gerard Neveu:

“The big winner today is endurance racing as the door is now opened to many additional competitors to compete at the highest level on both sides of the Atlantic with the same car.

“The two sanctioning bodies should be congratulated for their vision and spirit of collaboration. Le Mans Hypercars and the new LMDh cars racing together at Le Mans or Daytona will be an incredibly exciting prospect for endurance fans across the world.”

IMSA President John Doonan:

“On the eve of IMSA’s 51st season of competition, future race fans will regard today as one of the most significant of all time for IMSA, the ACO and the world of sports car racing.

“Providing a common platform for top-level prototype racing globally has been a goal for the sanctioning bodies, our manufacturers – and most importantly, sports car racing fans everywhere – for many years, and we are proud to say the opportunity has finally arrived. We are grateful for the collaboration with our partners at the ACO and the open dialogue with our manufacturer partners that led us to today’s introduction of the LMDh platform.”

What Happens Next?

DSC understands that the plans revealed today will be voted on at the next FIA World Motorsport Council meeting 6 March in Geneva), where Hypercar and LMDh should be ratified for the 2021-2022 WEC calendar.

Thereafter a raft of further detail is likely to emerge at the ‘Super Sebring’ meeting including a new name for the combined Hypercar and LMDh class, technical regulations and very likely a decision on whether the Hypercars will feature as options for IMSA races.


Hybrid or No Hybrid for LMDh?

A spec. rear axle harvesting KERS system (40-50 bhp) looks certain to be mandatory for the new LMDh breed, harvesting to be achieved under braking and energy to delivered back through the rear.



There is no news yet on the progress with the process to tender and/ or source a supplier for the system.




Will Grandfathered LMP1s and/ or Gen 1 DPis be allowed?




No mention has been made of whether or not older top classs cars from either Championship will be permitted in competition once the new combined class is launched.

That determination will likely be made based on declarations of interest from interested parties in the coming days, weeks and months.

Which chassis will be available for the new LMDh class

LMDh will continue to be based on spec LMP2 chassis with new chassis designs to come from all four current suppliers (Dallara, Ligier, Multimatic and ORECA) – that is set to effectively reset the clock in LMP2 in an attempt to re-open a more competitive LMP2 marketplace after recent ORECA dominance but will likely disappoint a small group of potential chassis suppliers that would have liked to be part of consideration for the next generation of LMP2 chassis supply.

Will the LMDhs retain the ‘look of DPi?



No, the intention is that the new cars will feature much more extensive road car styling cues – rather oddly not far short of what ‘Hypercar’ was intended to produce!

The days of DPis looking very similar to their LMP2 brethren are numbered.


Who is interested in the new formula?



A refreshingly lengthy list is in the mix.



In addition to likely re-commitment from Acura, Mazda, and hopefully Cadillac/ GM there is known interest in either North American and/ or global programmes from Ford, Lamborghini, Lexus, McLaren, and Porsche with others also in the wings.

The convergence also offers the opportunity and prospect of parallel programmes to add additional cars for either full-season, or selected races in support of major endurance race programmes.



Industry sources have also confirmed that the Peugeot programme, slated for 2022 introduction, is now likely to switch from Hypercar to LMDh.


How long will the homologation of LMDh last?

A minimum of five years is envisaged for LMDh cars, with Pierre Fillon confirming a commitment to the new LMP2 regulations for a decade.
http://www.dailysportscar.com/2020/01/2 ... gence.html

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Fri Jan 24, 2020 21:39 pm
by erwin greven
ORECA Abandons Hypercar Plans

ORECA to focus entirely on LMDh projects even if Peuegot opts for Le Mans Hypercar platform…


ORECA has abandoned plans to build a Le Mans Hypercar, even if Peugeot ends up opting to go with the FIA and ACO’s platform for its planned World Endurance Championship program with Rebellion Racing in 2022.

The French constructor, which has been in talks with Peugeot to become the technical partner for the program, has instead placed its full focus on IMSA and the ACO’s new global LMDh formula according to ORECA president Hugues de Chaunac.

“From the ORECA side, we’re going to focus completely on the global platform, which means we will not work on a Hypercar project. We cannot do everything,” de Chaunac said.

“At the moment I think the choice is easy. All of the OEMs have real budget problems because they’re investing a lot in electric and green [technology], etc.

“It’s very difficult for the racing people to come to the board because it’s not a top priority. So if it’s a low budget, it’s much easier and I think for a new car manufacturer coming in today, it’s the only attractive way. It’s a big advantage.”

Announced on Friday, the new joint IMSA-ACO platform will be eligible in the WEC beginning with the 2021-22 season and starting in the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship in 2022.

While budget targets have not yet been disclosed by the sanctioning bodies, it’s understood to be significantly less than the initial Hypercar formula, which will remain eligible in WEC through 2026.

“The big problem is the budget,” de Chaunac said. “If you do a Hypercar it’s high budget. If you do a global platform it’s a lower budget.

“I think to be attractive today for a car manufacturer, they’re asking two questions: Can my car win Le Mans and Daytona? Yes. Is the budget much lower than Hypercar? Yes.”

ORECA technical director David Floury confirmed that the company had undertaken feasibility studies last year on a Hypercar, as well as some conceptual aero work on what’s believed to have been for Peugeot.

While LMDh is believed to be ticking “quite a few boxes” for Peugeot, both Floury and de Chaunac said they cannot comment on which direction the manufacturer will take.

“This announcement has been done at the moment where Peugeot is thinking which way they have to do,” de Chaunac said.

“They’re working on the Hypercar project. Besides that, for the new OEMs coming, for sure they want to have the global platform.

“We have enough discussion and contact at the moment to see the interests coming from the OEMs.

“I’m sure in the coming months, before June, that you will have one or two or three announcements.”

De Chaunac and Floury declined to confirm how many LMDh projects ORECA could accommodate, indicating they would rather focus on quality over quantity.

ORECA will be one of one of four constructors that will be permitted to build LMDh chassis around a new survival cell that will accommodate hybrid systems and a larger fuel tank than currently seen on the LMP2-based chassis.

“For sure being based on a cost-capped LMP2 it will reduce the costs quite significantly while it’s global so with the same car you can win in Daytona, Sebring, Le Mans and in WeatherTech and WEC makes it a very good investment for the OEMs,” Floury added.
https://sportscar365.com/lemans/wec/ore ... car-plans/

Re: WEC Hypercar and IMSA DPi 2.0 Main topic

Posted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 04:21 am
by MonteCristo
Well, let's see how this goes.

Could be interesting.