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On this day in Motor Racing's past

Racing events, drivers, cars or anything else from the past.
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Re: On this day in Motor Racing's past

Post by Everso Biggyballies » 4 months ago

Last post from previous page:

A couple of On this Day anniversaries have slipped through over the weekend....

October 26
The famous tyre explosion of Mansell.....
1986 The 1986 Formula 1 World Championship was decided on this day in Adelaide after a dramatic three-way title fight. Nigel Mansell entered the race with a points advantage over McLaren’s Alain Prost and Williams team-mate Nelson Piquet. The Englishman was running in the third position that would have delivered the title when his rear tyre punctured at high speed on the Dequetteville Terrace to spectacularly end his hopes. Race leader Keke Rosberg (McLaren) had exited in similar fashion on his last appearance before retirement so Piquet pitted as a precaution leaving Prost, who had fresher rubber due to a previous puncture, to cruise to victory and a second world title.

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That day in Jerez
1997 For the second time in four years, the world championship was decided by a collision on this day in 1997, but this time Michael Schumacher was not the beneficiary. He crashed into Jacques Villeneuve’s Williams as his Canadian rival moved for the lead on lap 48 of the European Grand Prix at Jerez. Schumacher was out but Villeneuve was able to drag his damaged car to the line in third position to snatch the title. The FIA excluded runner-up Schumacher from the 1997 standings for deliberately driving into a rival. Mika Häkkinen and David Coulthard passed Villeneuve on the last lap with the Finn a GP winner for the first time.

October 28
1930 Today is Bernie Ecclestone’s 88th birthday. Formula 1’s ‘ringmaster’ for 40 years, Ecclestone raced in 500cc Formula 3 during the 1950s and was Jochen Rindt’s manager a decade later. He acquired Brabham in 1972 and Nelson Piquet won the 1981 and 1983 World Championship for the team. Ecclestone was instrumental in reshaping the sport in his role as chief executive of the Formula 1 Constructors’ Association and then as its commercial rights holder from 1995 to 2017.

1951 The 1951 Spanish Grand Prix on the streets of Barcelona’s Pedralbes district provided the scene for that year’s Formula 1 decider between Alfa Romeo’s Juan Manuel Fangio and Ferrari team leader Alberto Ascari. Ferrari had won the last three GPs and Ascari qualified on pole position but an incorrect choice of wheel size led to their tyres overheating on race day. All four Ferraris suffered delaminating tyres during the early laps so Fangio eased to victory and his first world title. José Froilán González was second for Ferrari with Giuseppe Farina (Alfa Romeo) third. Ascari recovered to finish fourth but was six points adrift in the final standings.

October 30
1906 Inaugural Formula 1 world champion Giuseppe Farina was born in Turin on this day in 1906. He won half of the six Grands Prix during that 1950 season to beat Alfa Romeo team-mate Juan Manuel Fangio to the title. Farina scored another two such victories before retiring from the category at the end of 1955. He made a couple of ill-fated attempts to qualify for the Indianapolis 500 before giving up the sport completely two years later. He died in a road accident on the way to the 1966 French GP.
Farina
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1988 Pole winner Ayrton Senna recovered from a poor start and 14th position to win the Japanese Grand Prix to clinch the 1988 World Championship, 30 years ago today. McLaren team-mate Alain Prost was no match for the Brazilian when it drizzled and the double champion finished 13.363sec behind. Thierry Boutsen was third for Benetton and Ivan Capelli’s Leyton House March-Judd briefly led before retiring.-Judd briefly led before retiring. The Leyton Hose car was my favourite looking car at the time.... I loved the colour and the Newey design

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Post by MonteCristo » 4 months ago

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RIP Greg Moore. 19 years today.
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Post by Manfred Cubenoggin » 4 months ago

I watched the race on live TV. Even before the car came crashing to a stop, I figured poor Greg to be a goner.

Such a loss. RIP.
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Post by Antonov » 4 months ago

Mika Hakkinen claimed his first title 20 years ago.

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Post by Everso Biggyballies » 4 months ago

November 3rd 1968

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On this day Graham Hill won the Mexican Grand Prix at age 39, in his Gold Leaf Lotus 49B Cosworth, and with it confirmed his second World Championship.

Hill won the race having started on the second row of the grid, leading all but half a dozen laps. He finished well over a minute ahead of 2nd placed Bruce McLaren. Held just two weeks after the Mexico Olympics the race brought a sad year to an end, one that saw many drivers being killed.

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From the Fastlane youtube archive.


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Post by Antonov » 4 months ago

November 4th 2012

Kimi Raikkonen wins the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix for Lotus.
The most exciting race held at the venue to date.

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Post by Everso Biggyballies » 2 months ago

On this day, January 3rd 2019.....

Michael Schumacher turns 50 years old.

His family has released a statement to honour his birthday, and Ferrari have opened an exhibition in his honour at the Ferrari Museum.

Full details here: viewtopic.php?p=352461#p352461

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Post by Everso Biggyballies » 2 months ago

January 4th 1967

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On this day we sadly lost one of the all time great names in land and water speed records...... Donald Campbell lost his life at Coniston Waters whilst trying to take the World Water Record over 300mph. I remember the news of his death..... a hero of mine, I had all the Bluebird die cast models.

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Here is an article published by Motor Sport in 1992 on the 25th anniversary of Donalds death.
Obviously it does not include reference to more recent work to find hid body and wreckage.
At 8.46 on the morning of January 4 1967 Donald Campbell took what became the last great gamble of his life on Coniston Water. Only moments after speeding down the black lake at 297mph, he elected not to refuel, nor to let his wake die down, but to return immediately. At a speed estimated to be well beyond the 300mph average that he sought, his Bluebird turbojet hydroplane left the surface and somersaulted spectacularly to destruction. His body was never found.

Last month, in a simple but moving ceremony by the memorial that now stands to him in the quiet lakeland village, the 25th anniversary of his passing was remembered. Robin Brown, the chairman of the K7 Club named after Bluebird's racing number, laid a wreath on the memorial that is hewn from Coniston slate.

Ever since I first saw film of Campbell's accident, at the age of 14, I developed an obsession with the man and the many myths that surround him, but it still surprises me just how many others have been so similarly affected. Steve Holter, the curator of The Campbell Hall of Speed in Polegate, East Sussex, and of Paul Ffoulkes-Halberd's adjacent Filching Manor Motor Museum wherein lives a mock-up of K7 and Sir Malcolm Campbell's original K3, is but one example. "At the age of seven my father sat me on his knee to watch the television. Not an unusual thing for a father to do, but the date was January 4 1967. I remember it was about 5.45pm and that my Dad had said, 'It is the end of an era, you'll never see the like of this again. The end of an era and a very brave man.' I would have to be honest and say it was not a day that changed my life, nor were the comments of any meaning to me, but the events of January 7 were.

"I remember waking to find my 'rich' aunty Joan's brand new Triumph Herald convertible outside, which was very odd as she always visited us on Fridays after school. That day was a Saturday, but I was soon to find out what was happening. "Last night your father was taken ill, and died,' said my mum. After that I cannot remember a thing. One thing that did occur to me was the last thing I had done with my dad, watching the news from Coniston, and I determined to find out what had so impressed him to make me watch.
When time and money allowed I began reading about Donald M. Campbell, to collect the books written by him, about him, by his family, on his family, about the land speed record and about the water speed record. Books, models, postcards — anything that I could find. I quite clearly remember writing to Ken Norris at Norris Brothers for information: that letter was to end up on Tony James' desk, an event he reminded me about when I eventually met him in the flesh some 17 years later!

"But at the back of all this was the reason I got so hooked on record breaking and especially the Campbells: my father, who introduced me to the subject but was not interested himself. I cannot say I remember my father that well, I cannot claim to have known anything about Donald Campbell when he was alive, but I can say that in the intervening 25 years they have both given me a great deal.

"Maybe my reasons for admiring one man are a bit too personal, but I have been very fortunate to meet and in many cases become friends with the people who were around Donald Campbell when he was alive, and they have told me so much about the man himself, things that have never been published, private things, that I have developed a great admiration for him. And that in many ways has been reflected by the people I have since met who knew my father, and the things they have told me about him."

"I suppose it is a little like knowing someone secondhand, but if these two men had impressed these other people so much to have had a lasting effect, which has been passed on to me in recollection, then I am proud to have known them both in such a way."

Some have spoken as movingly, while others have been more pragmatic. The motorboat historian Kevin Desmond finds the name Campbell rarely leaves him alone. "In 21 years of my writing articles and books about land, air and waterborne motorsport, Donald Campbell and Bluebird have played a mysteriously recurring role. Although I never met 'The Skipper', just by listening to the anecdotal memories of a dozen who had dealings with him - particularly my dear friends Leo and Joan Villa - certainly gave me an objective knowledge of his character, even if lacking in subjective experience.

To me, Donald Campbell was a promiscuous, superstitious. courageous and ingenious go-getter. He knew how to fight back when the odds were stacked against him, although at times he suffered such emotional scars as a domineering father.

As the owner of both a fragment of Bluebird K7's wreckage and two scale models, and of a sizeable collection of the published works of Maurice Maeterlinck (who wrote the theatre play 'The Blue Bird' which so fascinated Sir Malcolm), and having written three books on motorboating history, each of which chronicles Donald's achievements to a greater or lesser degree, I am what might be called a second-generation aficionado. But then so are Ken Warby, the current water record holder, Steve Holter, yourself, Martin Summers, modeller Fred Harris, artist Arthur Benjamins, Speed Record Club founder Robin Richardson and several others bathed in the magnetic 'Bluebird blue' speed haze.

"When, two years ago, Lady Arran and I assembled a team which designed and built a boat which broke the World Electric Water Speed Record, Campbell's persuasive genius in the building of the Bluebird CN7 car was my strategic inspiration for the 50mph An Straciag. I would like to think that, had he been alive today, aged 70, the man who had been on the point of getting heavily involved with the potential of waterjet propulsion, would still have made a very positive input towards our dream of a 100mph superconducting electric hydroplane British, of course!"

My own obsession began shortly after seeing Campbell's accident on television, when I happened upon a copy of Richard Hough's BP Book of the Racing Campbells. I believe it cost me 12/6d, a good week's pocket money. It was instrumental in nurturing my fascination for the land and water speed records. To me Donald Campbell was an intensely loyal, cunning, flamboyant yet ultimately lonely man, abnormally brave. Driven by an inner desire to prove to himself that he was as good as his father had been, yet trapped in Sir Malcolm's long shadow to the point where no matter what he achieved, he would never feel it was enough. What fascinates me most is that he was at times genuinely afraid of what he was doing, and yet he persevered. His successes included not just seven water speed records (more than anyone else), one land record and the unique feat of breaking both in the same year, but a lifetime's triumph over fear, either of a physical nature after his 360mph accident at Bonneville or, to him worse still, of failure.

Such is that fascination that I am now researching the definitive book on Donald Campbell, and would be delighted to hear from any readers who have personal anecdotes they would like to share. I can be contacted at 85 Kingshill Drive, Harrow HA3 8QQ.

To Donald Campbell life was a series of mountains that one had to climb. He spent much of his career atop summits, and was within striking distance of his highest and most challenging when Bluebird flipped. Even today, 25 years on, it is possible to stop in the russet red and vivid green beauty that surrounds Coniston, and be touched by an atmosphere still redolent of the ghost of a great Englishman who spared nothing as he reached out for the ultimate. -- DJT
https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/arch ... BY,1W497,1

A BBC doco on Campbell from a year or so ago.


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Post by Everso Biggyballies » 2 months ago

14th January.... a year now since we lost Dan Gurney.

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Post by Everso Biggyballies » 1 month ago

February 15th 1929,

Graham Hill was born, and would have celebrated his 90th Birthday today.

Mexican Grand Prix Decides Graham Hill As World Champion (1968)




1969 Mexican GP Highlights. (Barrie Gill)



1962 Dutch GP

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1962 South African GP.

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1966 Indy 500 (2 images)

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1968 Spanish G
P
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Monaco 1969
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South Africa (Rob Walkers car) South African GP

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Le Mans 1972

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1975British GP Retirement Tribute lap
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